Wold Performing Arts Center

Transitions conference 2018

Sep. 21, 7:30 a.m.

Transitions: Empowering independent learning

Transitions brings together experts and professionals from all over the county to help students with learning differences transition from high school to higher education.

The keynote speaker and informative breakout sessions provide in-depth lectures on ADHD/ADD, dyslexia, executive functioning, ASD and other learning differences. It's perfect for education professionals, psychologists, university-bound students and parents.  

For university-bound students: A day in the life of a college freshman
Students learn firsthand what they can expect their first year in college. Brief breakout sessions include transition topics such as housing, advising and learning strategies. Students experience lunch in the dining commons, tour the campus and see a dorm room.

Conference registration

Receive $10 off the general price with early bird registration. Early bird ends May 31.

General admission: $50 (early bird), $60 after May 31
Group of three or more: $50
University-bound student: Free

For more information, contact conference coordinator Peggy Peterson at ppeterson@lynn.edu or +1 561-237-7766.


Pre-conference master class

Neurodiversity in Cinema
Thursday, Sept. 20
6-9 p.m.

Tickets: $20 | Free with Lynn ID

During an interactive lecture, Transitions keynote speaker, Stephen Tonti, will explore the various ways in which certain ‘unique brain-wirings’ make their way onto the big screen and take various examples across cable and network television and compare those examples with their feature film counterparts. What’s working? What isn’t?

Register for master class


Keynote Speakers

Stephen Tonti, keynote speaker for Transitions Conference.
Stephen Tonti

Keynote speaker: morning 
Perfectly Imperfect Transitions: From High School to College

Stephen Tonti, keynote speaker for Transitions Conference.
Stephen Tonti

Stephen Tonti is a fierce advocate and a self-described ‘creative-type.’ Stephen knows firsthand, how to leverage his ADHD for success. You may recognize him from his 2013 TEDx talk Attention Different, NOT Deficit, which he delivered as an undergraduate student at Carnegie Mellon University. Stephen co-founded, Attention Different, an advocacy and educational organization working to reframe the way ADHD is understood and accepted. Tonti co-hosts The Attention Different podcast (available on iTunes), has made guest appearances on ADHD Rewired and Cognitive Rampage and is a regular contributor to Attention Magazine.

Learn more about Stephen

Dean Starbuck Bragonier keynote speaker for Transitions Conference.
Dean Starbuck Bragonier

Keynote speaker: afternoon
The Golden Age of Dyslexia

Dean Starbuck Bragonier keynote speaker for Transitions Conference.
Dean Starbuck Bragonier

Shaped by the challenges associated with his dyslexia and after struggling through the traditional secondary education system, Dean Bragonier became a diligent and successful college student who developed a love of learning at Bates College. Upon graduation, Bragonier embraced his entrepreneurial instincts and acquired a small seasonal restaurant on Martha’s Vineyard Island that he transformed into a successful full-scale enterprise. It was through this endeavor that he was able to contextualize his years of laborious academic learning and discover the true gifts of his dyslexic mind. As a social entrepreneur, Bragonier has founded nonprofit organizations and has served as a board member and an adviser to a number of others. 

Learn more about Dean

Conference information

Conference schedule
7:30 a.m.
Conference registration and continental breakfast
8:15 a.m.
Welcome
Lynn University President Kevin M. Ross
Shaun Exsteen, executive director, Institute for Achievement and Learning
8:30 a.m.
MORNING KEYNOTE
Imperfect Transitions: From High School to College

Presenter: Stephen Tonti
9:45 a.m.
Break: coffee stations are located in the Wold Performing Arts Center
and de Hoernle International Center lobbies
10–11:15 a.m.
Breakout sessions one
Letting Go: Transferring Locus of Control from Us to Them
Presenter: Lauren W. Solomon; Jennifer Schoolfield

Higher Education UDL: Until learning has no barriers
Presenter: Jennifer J. Lesh, Ph.D.

The Anxiety Explosion
Presenter: Edan M. Alcalay, Psy.D.

Consideration of sensory processing as an element in transition planning

Presenter: Sonia Kay, Ph.D.

Generation Z is here, are they ready? How to promote independence
for transitioning to university

Presenter: Melissa Knight, M.A., BCC, PCC; Shaun Exsteen, M.Ed.

Unlocking the Keys to College Success: Self-Awareness & Self-Advocacy
Presenter: Amy Salomon Kohn, M.S.Ed.; Monica Kaplan, Psy.D.
11:15 a.m.
Break
11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
Breakout sessions two
Let's Talk About Careers! #DontWaitUntilYouGraduate
Presenter: Lynn Miner-Rosen, M.Ed., ACC, CDCS

Transferring the Baton: How to effectively support without enabling
Presenter: Elaine Taylor-Klaus, CPCC, PCC

Opening the social circle: Tips to help young adults connect
Presenter: Alison Bourdeau, M.S.Ed.

Practical guide for understanding those who learn differently than the herd
Presenter: Michael Rizzo, Ph.D.

Seeing is believing: The power of Vision Boards
Presenters: Jenny La Monica, Ph.D.

The college application process for students with learning differences
Presenter: Melissa Masland
1 - 2 p.m.
LUNCH
2:15 - 3:30 p.m.
AFTERNOON KEYNOTE
The Golden Age of Dyslexia

Presenter: Dean Starbuck Bragonier
Breakout session one: 10–11:15 a.m.

Letting Go: Transferring Locus of control from us to them
Presenter: Lauren W. Solomon; Jennifer Schoolfield

This topic focuses on helping high school students develop/improve executive function skills that foster independence, resilience and success through the transition process. Specific topics include scaffolding, how much is too much and how and when to gradually reduce or remove it? How to improve internal motivation, a challenge for students with ADHD, Executive Function Weaknesses, the perfectionist, the procrastinator and students with learning disabilities? The impact of the cognitive workings of the human brain, the vulnerabilities of the adolescent brain, the impact of technology, and external motivational systems and structures will be examined. A collaborative approach is recommended that includes the adolescent, parents, teachers, college counselors and any and all professionals in their lives to best support and prepare youngsters to be resilient, independent and competent problem solvers. A power point presentation with handouts, case study, small group and large group discussion will be utilized.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the physiological connection between observed behavior and underlying causation to improve strategic planning and implementation of transitions
  • Provide information and strategies for beginning difficult conversations about preparation for transitions and for conducting ongoing dialogue for change in structural supports, scaffolding, decision making and independence
  • Increase awareness and understanding of the impact of electronic devices on the human and adolescent brain and the importance of creating calm spaces and mindful habits to decrease distractibility and increase motivation

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, guidance counselors, parents


Higher Education UDL: Until learning has no barriers
Presenter: Jennifer J. Lesh, Ph.D.

No longer is it acceptable for college students to sit in university classes and be expected to absorb the professor’s audio lecture and write or record notes in order to later regurgitate the information on a paper and pencil exam. In this session, attendees will learn about the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework and how to implement the three core UDL principles in higher education settings. Attendees will participate and engage in multiple means of presentation of new material, engagement with the new material and how students express what they have learned. After participating in this session, attendees will be able to implement several UDL concepts and strategies in their own higher education settings

Learning objectives:

  • Explain the three principles of UDL
  • Identify examples of UDL implemented in higher education
  • Implement multiple means representation, engagement and expression

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, guidance counselors


The Anxiety Explosion
Presenter: Edan M. Alcalay, Psy.D.

Who am I? What will I do? What should I study? What will I be? What is going to happen if…? What if…? are all questions that fuel anxiety during the transition period. During this stage, moderate levels of anxiety can manifest and create much distortion. Often, it can be seen as ADHD or as a learning disorder. However, if we can assist these individuals into a smooth transition, then successful resolution, increased learning and identity formation can be accomplished. Dr. Edan M. Alcalay will discuss the recent trends affecting adolescents and how anxiety has significantly increased over the last 30 years. He will also identify specific markers and techniques to reduce anxiety and stress.

Learning objectives:

  • Increase knowledge and identify anxiety symptomatology
  • Define the developmental stage of adolescence
  • Identify the factors leading to the recent increase in an

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, guidance counselors, parents


Consideration of sensory processing as an element in transition planning
Presenters: Sonia Kay, Ph.D.

Information from the sensory system allows individuals to understand the environment and respond to the demands of various environments. Every person has a unique sensory profile that partially determines their preferences for and aversions to in their chosen activities. Therefore, when considering a vocational, educational or housing transition selection, consideration of the sensory qualities of the person, environment and the tasks completed in that environment can facilitate improved performance. Using the person-environment-occupation (PEO) model, occupational therapists assess the student sensory profile, the environmental sensory characteristics, and the sensory qualities of the task. Then using that information, the occupational therapist can make recommendations for an appropriate match and/or modification to task or environment. This presentation will focus on understanding the sensory processing model that provides a foundation for the occupational therapy process. In addition, participants will learn and practice strategies for using the model through use of case study.

Learning objectives:

  • Identify the role of the sensory system in determining activity preferences
  • Analyze the environment and tasks using the sensory processing model
  • Use the PEO model and sensory processing model to apply presented concepts to a case study

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, guidance counselors, parents


Generation Z is here. Are they ready? How to promote independence for transitioning to university
Presenters: Melissa Knight, M.A., BCC, PCC; Shaun Exsteen, M.Ed.

Learn about the characteristics of Generation Z along with the challenges they are facing as they transition into higher education.  One area of concern with this generation is the increasing number of students experiencing anxiety that can have a negative impact on creating independence. These struggles can be connected to poor executive functioning skills. When working with students experiencing such difficulties, you might be wondering how they will survive the first year of college when they are marginally getting through high school with your constant involvement. Sometimes when we help too much, we are enabling instead of empowering. Fortunately, we can support our students in creating new habits to empower them to become independent learners. Implementing motivational interviewing techniques is one strategy that will help promote an environment that fosters the independence required for the transition from high school to college.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn who Generation Z is
  • By improving executive functioning, you will empower the college-bound student to become more independent
  • Identify the Executive Functioning (EF) skill sets necessary for a successful transition from high school to college

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, guidance counselors, parents


Unlocking the keys to college success: Self-Awareness & Self-Advocacy
Presenters: Amy Salomon Kohn, M.S.Ed.; Monica Kaplan, Psy.D.

Students who actively advocate for their learning needs and respective accommodations, and who disclose their learning disabilities to their colleges, graduate college at twice the rate as those who do not. This session will lay out steps students, families and educators can take before college to prepare students for the transition to college and set students up for ongoing success. We will provide an action plan that will include activities to support the development of these skills, building the foundation for a successful transition to college. We will focus on developing an understanding and acceptance of one's learning profile and how to best advocate for those learning needs. Activities will include: completing a learning profile, creating a personalized summary of your neuropsychological/psychoeducational evaluation, and role-playing mock conversations with professors and Office of Disability Services.

Learning objectives:

  • Recognize the importance of understanding one’s individual learning profile
  • Develop the ability to articulate one’s learning needs and accommodations
  • Gain skills and knowledge to advocate for your needs and accommodations with a variety of constituencies

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, guidance counselors, parents

Breakout sessions two: 11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Let's Talk About Careers! #DontWaitUntilYouGraduate
Presenter: Lynn Miner-Rosen, M.Ed., ACC, CDCS

Let’s talk about your future! It is NOT too soon! Research shows that graduating millennials are underemployed and often, unemployed at staggering rates. Students can no longer wait until their senior year or graduation to think about securing a job or a future career. For students, the thought and exploration about their future career needs to begin now and not later. But, where do you start? In this presentation parents, educators and students will get an overview of a proven and successful career development coaching process specifically geared to high school and college students with ADHD, ASD, EFD and other learning differences. Conference attendees will get career exploration strategies that reflect their career goals and steps to achieve those goals. Students should take action now to be successful and employed upon graduation. There will be handouts, worksheets and time for questions and answers.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn about current career information and why NOW is the time to think about
    careers for all current and incoming college students.
  • Understand the unique challenges and potential that students with ADD/ADHD, LD, EFD and high functioning ASD have regarding their future career and why they should start planning now.
  • Learn strategies, tips, and action steps for career path exploration, interest identification, exposure and experience that may lead to a great job upon graduation. #DontWaitUntilYouGraduate

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, parents


Transferring the Baton: How to effectively support without enabling
Presenter: Elaine Taylor-Klaus, CPCC, PCC

You don’t want to see your kids fail, but you don’t want to do everything for them, either, right? The pull between supporting and enabling escalates as high school graduation draws near. In the early years of college, it can cause conflict in parent-teen relationships, family dynamics and marriages. But as parents, you can absolutely shift this classic dilemma. This interactive workshop introduces the four phases of parenting for independence, and the five key motivators students need to take action in their lives and education. You'll learn language to improve communication, strategies to set realistic expectations and the truth about asking for help—and why your kids tend to resist it. Figure out when to let kids manage things on their own (and risk failure) and when to support them for success. Learn how to shift your approach as a parent—and help your kids take ownership of their lives.   

Learning objectives:

  • Identify the four phases parents move through in the process of transferring ownership to kids for their education and life.
  • Determine what’s standing in the way of teens and young adults asking for the help they need in school and self-management
  • Explore the five motivators required for teens and young adults to do school work and manage lives independently and identify how to help them use those motivators most effectively

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, guidance counselors, parents


Opening the social circle: Tips to help young adults connect
Presenters: Alison Bourdeau, M.S.Ed.

The transition to higher education is a time filled with new experiences and challenges, both academic and social. This session is designed to provide information for professionals and families as to the identification and development of ecologically valid social opportunities for young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and other "related disabilities." In this context, "related disabilities" would also include individuals with anxiety and other social challenges. Included in this session would be the current research on social skills interventions for young adults with ASD, as well as the correlation between low social engagement and depression. Utilizing the data gained from facilitating a social skills group for two years through FAU CARD, the presenter will then provide tips on the identification and development of ecologically valid social skill opportunities. Anecdotal feedback from group participants will also be provided, as well as available community resources.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn about current research in relation to social skills and social engagement for young adults with ASD and related disabilities
  • Learn how to identify and develop ecologically valid social skill opportunities for adults with ASD and related social challenges
  • Learn how to access resources related to this topic within their community

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, guidance counselors, parents


Practical guide for understanding those who learn differently than the herd
Presenter: Michael Rizzo, Ph.D.

Educators and parents must become “experts” at understanding neurodiversity before they can develop an appropriate remediation/accommodation plan and/or learning environment. This will help students to demonstrate executive functioning mastery (i.e., the ability to attend as expected), and to accumulate knowledge (i.e., reading, writing, and math). Science has determined that neurodiversity is real and that no two students learn the same way. Herding all kids into the same teaching methodologies leaves a large group blocked from attaining success.   
 
Difficulties socializing, learning, and executive functioning shortcomings must be viewed as the tip of the iceberg. In this presentation, participants will be exposed to a conceptual model that has consensus in neuroscience as a logical foundation in determining what cognitive networks in non-traditional learners are different from most peers. We will also examine how diverse networks influence other systems, and how utilizing more intact networks (areas of personal strength) can enhance success.

Learning objectives:

  • Understanding neurodiversity
  • Empowering diverse learners to be more successful
  • Recognizing that poor attention and frustrations are symptoms, not problems

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, guidance counselors, parents


Seeing is believing: The power of Vision Boards
Presenters: Jenny La Monica, Ph.D.

Vision boards powerfully assist students in identifying deeply held desires and goals for academic achievement, future vocations, social lives and inner-selves. Once these goals have been identified and visually manifested, accessing and reinforcing the intrinsic motivation necessary to achieve them becomes easier. Vision boards also greatly facilitate the subsequent processes of goal-setting and step-by-step planning and help students stay focused on the desired outcomes. Finally, the creative process involved in making a vision board engages different “ways of knowing” and draws upon often lesser academically utilized intelligence and skills. Igniting creativity, encouraging positive visualization and setting aflame one's belief in their own potential are additional collateral benefits that can enrich their success during the transition to college, or at any future crossroads in life.

Learning objectives:

  • Employ a new approach to goal setting through the visual manifestation of vision boards
  • Utilize vision boards as a means of building and reinforcing intrinsic motivation
  • Use this innovative arts-based activity as a different way to engage the mind and psyche

Suggested audience: educators, professionals, guidance counselors, parents


The college application process for students with learning differences
Presenter: Melissa Masland

Applying to college is an exciting but often stressful process. For the student with learning differences, it can be exponentially more so. I have worked with students with LD for the past seven years, helping them apply to college and find the school best suited to their learning profiles. This presentation will break down the process year-by-year and step-by-step so families know what needs to be done and when. I will also discuss how to evaluate the support services offered at a school and give families a list of questions to ask when visiting a campus. I will also have a handout of the life skills a student should be working towards to ease the transition to college.

Learning objectives:

  • Timeline of the process starting freshman year
  • Researching college support services
  • Documentation required for accessing support services in college

Suggested audience: guidance counselors, parents

Student experience schedule
7:30 a.m.Conference registration and continental breakfast
8:15 a.m
Welcome/keynote presentation
9:45 a.m.
Students meet in front of the Wold Performing Arts Center
under the University Experience sign.
10 a.m.
Campus tour
11:15 a.m.
What every college professor wants you to know but doesn’t teach you
Presenter: Honey Frydman

Get a glimpse into a college course, and focus on strategies for academic success in college.
12:15 p.m.
LUNCH
1:20 p.m.
College 101: useful advice and tips from a college professor
Presenter: Diane DiCerbo, director of academic advising

Learn the difference between high school and college; how to be an active participant in your education process; the distinctions between core classes, major classes and electives; the value of time management; the importance of taking advantage of opportunities outside
the classroom; getting involved in internships and the prospect of studying abroad. 
2 p.m.
How to get involved outside the classroom
Enjoy refreshments poolside with Lynn University student leaders.
2:50 p.m.
Lynn University student panel
Presenters: Lynn students
Moderated by: Catherine Wharton

Hear about collegiate experiences directly from university students and a panel of junior and senior students who have experience with transitioning, taking college classes and using support services.
3:30 p.m.
Students return to the Wold lobby for pickup
Exhibitor Opportunities

Exhibitors play an essential role in the success of the entire conference. Connect with educational professionals, psychologists, guidance counselors, parents and students as an exhibitor at the 2018 Transitions conference. Last year, we welcomed more than 500 attendees. We expect to exceed that number this year.

Exhibitor information

Fee: $150 per table

Benefits:

  • One 6’ x 30’’ skirted table and two chairs
  • Additional equipment such as electricity, internet, etc. is available at no additional cost and should be conveyed to the conference coordinator in advance of the conference.
  • Two (2) complimentary registrations. Includes attendance to any educational session and luncheon.
  • Lynn University conference tote bag.
  • Breakfast and lunch

General information

Transitions: Empowering independent learning conference
Lynn University
Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center
3601 N Military Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
http://lynn.edu/transitions

Set-up Hours
Friday, Sept. 21 – 6-7:15 a.m. Lobby, Wold Performing Arts Center
Parking is available behind the building

Exhibit Hall Hours
Friday, Sept. 21 – 7:30 a.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Please do not break down your table until the afternoon keynote starts at 2:15 p.m.

Secure your table online for the 2018 Transitions Conference or contact Peggy Peterson at 561-237-7766 or ppeterson@lynn.edu.


Accommodations

A block of rooms have been reserved at Boca Raton Wyndham Hotel at a discounted price.

Reservations:

  • Make your reservations online.
  • To make reservations via phone, please call 1-888-404-6880 and refer to Transitions 2018-Lynn University and your date of arrival.

Standard Room: $85.00
Pool View:
$105.00
Suite:
$145.00  

Hotel room rates are subject to applicable sales taxes currently 13%.  

All reservations need to be confirmed by August 24th, 2018.  After this date, rooms and discounted rates will be subject to availability.

Meet the speakers

Edan Alcalay 2
Edan Alcalay, Psy.D.

Breakout Session 1
The Anxiety Explosion

Edan Alcalay 2
Edan Alcalay, Psy.D.

Dr. Alcalay received his Doctorate in Clinical Psychology with a specialization in children at Carlos Albizu University located in Miami, Florida. During his training, Dr. Alcalay conducted research on Teaching Responsible Behaviours to Adolescents (TRBA), and Program fdor Alcohol Abusing Adolescent using Combined Therapy & Exercise (PACTE). As continuing education, Dr. Alcalay has received advanced training from the Florida Psychoanalytic Center. Clinically, Dr. Alcalay has worked in substance abuse rehabilitation for adolescents and adults in Community Mental Health Clinic (CMHC) working for the underprivileged population. Subsequently, he cointinued at Miami Children's Hospital Psychiatry Department, conducting individual, group and family psychotherapy for patients with severe childhood psychiatric problesm. He received his post-doctoral training at the Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders.

Dian Di Cerbo 20160513 001 Web 800X800 625Ee77D15103B39073Eca40F7D021F4
Diane DiCerbo, M.Ed.

Student Experience
College 101: useful advice and tips from a college professor

Dian Di Cerbo 20160513 001 Web 800X800 625Ee77D15103B39073Eca40F7D021F4
Diane DiCerbo, M.Ed.

Diane DiCerbo, director of academic advising and assistant professor of mathematics, has worked at Lynn University for the past 32 years. As an educator, she believes that all students can learn and be successful. Students need to understand not only important mathematical concepts, but also how they relate to their everyday life. Making these important connections sparks their interest and desire to learn more for the betterment of their future.

Shaun Exsteen
Shaun Exsteen, M.Ed.

Breakout Session 1
Generation Z is here, are they ready? How to promote independence for transitioning to university

Shaun Exsteen
Shaun Exsteen, M.Ed.

Shaun holds a master’s degree in education with a concentration in Varying Exceptionalities with an ESOL endorsement from Lynn University, where he is currently the Executive Director for the Institute for Achievement and Learning. At Lynn, Shaun developed a passion for helping students with learning differences who have experienced difficulty in the academic realm and has worked within the field of learning disabilities since 1993. He continues to help students who need academic support while attending university, working closely with the Admission department on the initial review process. Shaun serves as the Chair of the Dialogues of Innovation Curriculum (J-Term), and has taught classes in Language and Learning Development, Education, First Year Experience and the Dialogues of Self and Society. He has also provided students with the opportunity to visit his home country by leading educational Study Abroad trips to South Africa.

Honey Frydman
Honey Frydman, M.Ed.

Student Experience
What every college professor wants you to know but doesn’t teach you

Honey Frydman
Honey Frydman, M.Ed.

Honey received her undergraduate degree from Florida Atlantic University and her M.Ed. from Lynn University in Boca Raton, Florida.  Honey has worked in higher education and has been coaching college students with learning differences  for over ten years.  She specializes in students dealing with anxiety and finding strategies to help them cope with the issues of transitioning into college and managing  their daily lives.  She has given presentations on coping with anxiety campus wide and serves as the  liaison to both the Admission and the Americans with Disabilities Act departments. Honey’s chapter, Coping with Anxiety, was published in the Lynn University’s iBook created for incoming freshmen. Honey is an Associate Certified Coach through the International Coach Federation and a Senior Coach at Lynn University.

Kaplan Monica Headshot
Monica Kaplan, Ph.D.

Breakout Session 1
Unlocking the Keys to College Success: Self-Awareness & Self-Advocacy

Kaplan Monica Headshot
Monica Kaplan, Ph.D.

Monica holds a B.S. in Human Development from Cornell University and a PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology from Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology at Yeshiva University. She has spent the last seven years as the Upper School Psychologist at Mary McDowell Friends School (MMFS) in Brooklyn, NY, the only K-12 Quaker school for students with language-based learning disabilities in the country. Monica's passion for working with students and families was sparked at the age of 14, when her youngest brother was diagnosed with autism. She now most enjoys her role as mom to a spirited and curious two-and-a-half year old son.

Sonia Kay2
Sonia Kay, Ph.D.

Breakout Session 1
Consideration of sensory processing as an element in transition planning

Sonia Kay2
Sonia Kay, Ph.D.

Dr. Kay is an associate professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy at Nova Southeastern University in the masters and doctoral program. She is licensed as an occupational therapist in the state of Florida and has worked as an occupational therapist in a variety of educational, clinical and medical settings. Dr. Kay specializes in the treatment of children of varying exceptionalities with a focus on autism, developmental disabilities, and sensory processing. Her research interests have been focused on autism spectrum disorder, sensory processing, and transition processes.

Melissa Knight
Melissa Knight, M.Ed.

Breakout Session 1
Generation Z is here, are they ready? How to promote independence for transitioning to university

Melissa Knight
Melissa Knight, M.Ed.

Melissa Knight holds an M.A. in Psychology, has over 15 years of experience in higher education and has been coaching high school and college students since 2006. In addition to coaching, Melissa is a trainer, adjunct college professor, speaker and author. Melissa supports her clients in shifting from feelings of frustration to feelings of success. Currently, she serves as the Director of Academic Coaching at Lynn University, is the President of C.A.S.C. Coaching, LLC and is an active member of ICF and AGO.

La Monica Photo
Jenny La Monica, Ph.D.

Breakout Session 2
Seeing is believing: The power of Vision Boards

La Monica Photo
Jenny La Monica, Ph.D.

Dr. La Monica has worked with college students for more than 13 years teaching a wide variety of art history classes and freshman seminars. Inspired by the struggles she saw many of her students face upon entry to college, she co-created a private college transition program. In that role, she helped many college students find success as they transition toward their higher education goals, often while navigating learning differences, social challenges, depression and anxiety. Her creativity and passion for the arts infuses her work, often lending valuable metaphors such as “reframing” challenges and difficult situations, seeking and appreciating the beauty around us, identifying our authenticity, and leaving our unique mark on the world.

Jennifer Lesh
Jennifer Lesh, Ph.D.

Breakout Session 1
Higher Education UDL: Until learning has no barriers

Jennifer Lesh
Jennifer Lesh, Ph.D.

Jennifer Lesh is currently an assistant professor at Lynn University Ross College of Education and is the coordinator of the Exceptional Student Education Master's Program.  Jennifer teaches at the undergraduate, masters, and doctoral level.  She received her B.S in special education with an emphasis in behavior modification at Indiana University, her M.S. and Ph.D. in educational leadership and special education from Barry University.  Lesh has presented topics within the special education realm extensively at the local, state, and national level and is currently a Council for Exceptional Children executive board member.

Melissa Masland
Melissa Masland

Breakout Session 1
The college application process for students with learning differences

Melissa Masland
Melissa Masland

Prior volunteering at College Track, a non-profit organization that helps underserved populations prepare for and apply to college, Melissa completed the UC Berkeley Extension College and Career Certificate Course in 2011. She began her own consulting business in 2011, with a focus on students with learning differences that stemmed from her daughter's experiences as a special education student. She is a determined advocate for disability rights and equal opportunity.

Lynn Miner Rosen 72Dpi
Lynn Miner-Rosen, M.Ed.

Breakout Session 2
Let's Talk About Careers! #DontWaitUntilYouGraduate

Lynn Miner Rosen 72Dpi
Lynn Miner-Rosen, M.Ed.

Lynn Miner-Rosen, M.Ed., ACC, CDCS is a certified ADHD Coach and Career Development Coach for high school seniors, college students and young adults, nationwide. Lynn has been a coach for over 5 years and works with clients that face challenges related to ADD/ADHD, executive functioning deficits and high functioning ASD. Lynn holds two master’s degrees in Elementary Education and Special Education from Adelphi University and has 12+ years of experience as a middle school teacher and IEP coordinator. Lynn teaches ADHD and ASD classes for a New York based institute, CORE Professional Development. Website: www.CoachLynnMR.com.

Michael Rizzo2
Michael Rizzo, Ph.D.

Breakout Session 2
Practical guide for understanding those who learn differently than the herd

Michael Rizzo2
Michael Rizzo, Ph.D.

For over 25 years, Dr. Rizzo has worked with children struggling with social emotional, behavioral, and /or academic difficulties. Beyond doctoral training, Dr. Rizzo also earned a Diplomate from the American Board of School Neuropsychology. He is no stranger to learning challenges having struggled as a child with what was later diagnose as ADHD, anxiety and dyslexia. Despite these difficulties, he never gave up. He went on to do great things, such as develop his practice in South Florida, Child Provider Specialists. Dr. Rizzo's philosophy is that no child should have to endure the journey toward adulthood that he took.

Salomon Kahn Amy
Amy Salomon-Kohn, M.S.Ed.

Breakout Session 1
Unlocking the Keys to College Success: Self-Awareness & Self-Advocacy

Salomon Kahn Amy
Amy Salomon-Kohn, M.S.Ed.

Amy holds an A.B. from Columbia and an M.S.Ed from the University of Pennsylvania. She is the Director of College Guidance at Mary McDowell Friends School (MMFS), the only K-12 Quaker school for students with language-based learning disabilities in the country. In her work, Amy incorporates the teaching of an understanding of one's learning disability and strong self-advocacy skills. Together with her Head of School, she co-chaired an MMFS committee that developed a K-12 learning disabilities curriculum. Amy, who is also the mother to a special needs child, has been published in Parents Magazine.

Jennifer Schoolfield
Jennifer Schoolfield

Breakout Session 1
Letting Go: Transferring Locus of control from us to them

Jennifer Schoolfield
Jennifer Schoolfield

Originally from the East Coast and holding a Bachelor of Arts from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Jennifer earned her Masters Degree in Counseling Psychology in 2005 from the University of San Francisco.  Having worked with children, adolescents and adults in various settings, she identified her interest in working with adolescents diagnosed with learning differences particularly as they look to post-secondary opportunities. Jennifer is also passionate about experiential education and the benefits that hands-on experience can offer students as they to begin thinking about academic and career pathways.  Currently, she serves as the Assistant Director of Compass High School (San Mateo, CA), a school dedicated to serving students diagnosed with learning differences. In addition to her work in schools, Jennifer has a private practice, Boldstrokes Consulting, which focuses on working with families to identify post-secondary and transitional opportunities for young adults diagnosed with learning differences.

Elaine Taylor Klaus 2
Elaine Taylor-Klaus, CPCC

Breakout Session 2
Transferring the Baton: How to effectively support without enabling

Elaine Taylor Klaus 2
Elaine Taylor-Klaus, CPCC

Elaine is a certified coach, author, co-Founder of ImpactADHD®, and co-creator of Sanity School®. A sought-after speaker for parents and educators, Elaine provides training, coaching and support for parents and teachers of “complex” kids—around the globe, online and on the phone. A lifelong advocate for public health, Elaine has served on Georgia’s Governor’s Council for Maternal and Infant Health and as a parent advisor for the American Academy of Pediatrics. Regularly featured in ADDitude and Attention magazines, she is the co-author of Parenting ADHD Now! Easy Intervention Strategies to Empower Kids with ADHD, and the mother of three young adults—an ADHD family of five. Find a wealth of resources on her award-winning blog at ImpactADHD.com.

Shaun Exsteen

“No student learns the same, and no one approach fits all students. At Transitions, you’ll leave with strategies to become a well-rounded educator, practitioner or parent.”

Shaun Exsteen, Executive Director, Institute for Achievement and Learning

Ticket required. Free with Lynn ID.

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Event categories
Target audience
Parents & families, Prospective students, Public, Students, Incoming students

Don't miss this amazing event

Transitions conference 2018
Sep. 21, 7:30 a.m.
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Wold Performing Arts Center

Contact

Peggy Peterson

Academic Events Coordinator

Phone: +1 561-237-7766

Email: ppeterson@lynn.edu