Undergraduate curriculum

General education and study in the major

Perspectives and Academic Skills

The university believes that a liberal arts education is an essential foundation for, and complement to, its many career-oriented programs. General education and study in the major contribute to achieving the university’s overall educational purpose: To produce graduates who possess knowledge, confidence, competencies and ethical consciousness to assume positions of responsibility and leadership as productive, global citizens prepared for lifelong learning.

General education knowledge and academic skills are developed within a diverse learning community of students and faculty in order to foster diversity of thought and provide the opportunity to integrate varied perspectives, experiences and breadth of learning. The major provides in-depth learning within a discipline or group of disciplines and further develops perspectives and academic skills. General education and education in the major contribute to students attaining the following baccalaureate degree competencies:

Perspectives

  • Acquisition of an outlook that shows reflective respect for individual differences, diversity of opinion and thought, multicultural and global awareness, and breadth and depth of learning.
  • Ability to cultivate the development of values and ethical consciousness for responsible participation in a complex, changing society.
  • Awareness of and appreciation for people, cultures and contemporary issues in preparation for participation in global transformations.
  • Breadth of learning in a variety of disciplines that informs judgments and encourages inquiry.
  • Depth and application of learning in a discipline or group of disciplines (mastery of specialized knowledge) to effectively serve and lead in a chosen profession.
  • Preparation for positions of responsibility and leadership as productive global citizens who value lifelong learning.

Academic Skills

  • Communication: Reading, writing, speaking and interpersonal/relationship skills.
  • Mathematical Computation: Computing, interpreting and drawing conclusions from quantitative data.
  • Computer Technology: Using computing hardware and software applications as tools in personal and professional environments.
  • Information Literacy: Identifying, locating, evaluating and using relevant information.
  • Intellectual Strategies: Problem-solving, critical and creative thinking, and inquiry.

Day student core curriculum

The Dialogues

Total 68 credits

* Dialogue course requirements may be embedded within the major. Dialogue course requirements vary for day students majoring in B.F.A. programs in the College of Communication and Design.

Core Curriculum for Full Time Undergradaute Program

As an institution that excels in interactive learning and innovative pedagogies, Lynn University’s core curriculum, the Dialogues, offers students the opportunity to develop the skills, knowledge and perspective essential to their intellectual, personal and professional education. The Dialogues offers an innovative approach to general education that integrates liberal and professional study, knowledge and skills acquisition, and multidisciplinary perspectives and methods within a four-year developmental and outcomes-based curriculum.

The origin of all learning is questioning; thinking, asking, and wondering why. Whether talking to ourselves or to others, dialogue is the medium through which we all learn, create, acquire and understand. At a time when the sheer volume of information is ever increasing, the essential skills of reasoning, analysis, reflection and the art of discourse remain essential. In the aesthetic dimensions of human imagination and creation, curiosity, wonderment and inspiration arise from sensory interactions and dialogues of self-expression. In addition, for every known fact or accepted truth, there is always a need to question, to constantly ask why, or else we surrender not only our capacity to think, but also our ability to learn, change and grow.

In that spirit, Lynn University’s core curriculum views dialogue, philosophically and pedagogically, as the basis for all learning. Using a thematic approach to the perennial questions and goals of liberal education, the core centers on three comprehensive domains of human thought, expression and action:

Dialogues of Self and Society

Dialogues of Belief and Reason

Dialogues of Justice and Civic Life

Additionally, students are also required to take courses in Dialogues of Quantitative Reasoning and Dialogues of Scientific Literacy. These two core knowledge areas are essential to engaged and informed citizenship in the 21st century. These courses are designed to give students the ability to understand and analyze quantitative information and scientific knowledge. In their content and pedagogy, the seminars within the Dialogues of Learning:

• Engage students in conversations exploring the richness of human thought historically, cross-culturally and across disciplinary boundaries.

• Create a culture of inquiry, reflection, commitment and action by requiring that every course be taught in a seminar format utilizing collaborative and interactive pedagogies.

• Foster an understanding of both the United States and global community from a historical and contemporary perspective.

• Integrate critical thinking and communication skills, information literacy, and technological literacy into every course.

• Structure the acquisition of both skills and knowledge in a four year progressively challenging and sequential schema that includes course work in the major and general education.

• Courses in the three main Dialogue areas (Belief and Reason; Justice and Civic Life; and Self and Society), are offered from both the American perspective and Global perspective.

American Perspective

Courses within the American perspective place value on the history and development of American society. This knowledge is inherent for informed and engaged citizenship. Courses within this perspective provide students with the opportunity to gather knowledge about American culture, history, politics, society and economics, relevant to our globalizing society. These courses also demonstrate an appreciation of and respect for American institutions and values through course content and assignments. Coursework reflects the processes, conditions and implications of American citizenship, providing an understanding of the role of the nation in global affairs. In order to achieve this goal the Dialogues of Belief and Reason, Justice and Civic Life, and Self and Society at the 100 level are taught from the American perspective.

Global Perspective

Courses within the Global perspective place value on the interconnectedness and inherent value of any culture, country or locale. These seminars furnish the opportunity for students to gather knowledge about cultures, histories, languages, politics, societies and economies, relevant to our globalizing society. Courses within the Global perspective demonstrate an appreciation of and respect for diverse global cultures through course content and assignments. Coursework reflects the processes, conditions and implications of cross- and inter-cultural interactions, providing an understanding of global citizenship. In order to achieve this goal the Dialogues of Belief and Reason, Justice and Civic Life, and Self and Society at the 200 level are taught from the Global perspective.

Writing

Courses in the three main Dialogue areas (Belief and Reason; Justice and Civic Life; and Self and Society) place strong emphasis on the enhancement of writing skills. Through writing exercises, editing, and revisions students will learn the writing process and amplify their skills. An importance on proper format, grammar, style and form will be placed. All Dialogues courses at the 100-level in Justice and Civic Life, and at the 200-level in Belief and Reason focus on the conventions of writing.

Structure and Requirements

The Dialogues of Learning include student learning outcomes in critical thinking, communications skills, information literacy and technological literacy. These outcomes are defined and measured based upon institutional-wide rubrics for each skill area that are developmental, requiring increasing levels of competency and ability.

During the first two years, the Dialogues engage students in common and core principles, ideas, people, concepts, great works, etc. that are essential to a liberal education. Seminars are structured for coherency and interdisciplinary perspectives through a combination of a common curricula and special topics; at least 50 percent of the course will contain common material and the remaining 50 percent will examine how these core principles and knowledge are applied in a diversity of disciplines.

In the third and fourth years, the Dialogue courses become increasingly integrated with the major fields of study with higher levels of skills acquisition and application with more in-depth content and focus. Students must complete two courses, one at the 300-level, and one at the 400-level, in all five Dialogue areas (Belief and Reason; Justice and Civic Life; Self and Society; Quantitative Reasoning; and Scientific Literacy).

The January Term

To accentuate and foster the spirit of innovation that distinguishes the Lynn experience, the core curriculum includes one additional requirement: a specially-designed educational component, the January Term (J-Term). Students are responsible for taking one Citizenship Project, one Career Preparation, and one Language and Culture J-Term course throughout their time at Lynn University.

The Citizenship Project

During the January Term, all first year students will take a course in The Citizenship Project. Courses in The Citizenship Project focus on a civic issue, problem or topic and will engage in experiential learning opportunities and community service work with local, community-based partners. Thematic areas for the courses include homelessness, environmental sustainability and urban renewal. Failure to complete this requirement by the end of the student’s first year will result in dismissal from the university

Language and Culture

Language and Culture courses will emphasize either: language acquisition with some reference to cultural matters; or a broader cultural survey of the target society with some “survival language” training included. Students will use an online language program. This platform is designed to reinforce conversation practice provided by native speakers.

Career Preparation

Within the Career Preparation theme, there are two tracks. The first involves directly preparing students for post-graduation employment; and the second prepares students to apply for, and enter, more advanced studies. Courses in Career Preparation for the workplace may include, are but not limited to, resume and cover letter preparation; interviewing skills; personality profile; work/business etiquette; and “dress for success” training. Additionally, they may include site visits, and guest speakers, from the chosen career field. Courses in Career Preparation for post-baccalaureate education may include, but are not limited to, preparation for the GRE, MCAT or LSAT exams; matching career goals and expectations to graduate programs; the importance of the application timeline; and CV, letter of introduction and interviewing protocol.

Listed Below Are The Courses That Meet Dialogue Double Count Requirements

AVM 431 GLOBAL AVIATION REGULATIONS AND LAW DJCG 400

AVM 481 AVIATION SEMINAR DJCG 400

BUS 317 SPORTS LAW AND RISK MANAGEMENT DJCA 300

BUS 322 STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS & ECONOMICS DQR 300 & DSL 300

BUS 350 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT DSSA 300

BUS 372 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS DJCA 300

BUS 408 POLITICAL AND CULTURAL DIMENSIONS OF GLOBAL MARKETS DJCG 400

BUS 414 SPORTS GOVERNANCE DJCA 400

BUS 425 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT DQR 400 & DSL 400

BUS 433 WILLS, TRUSTS AND FAMILY CORPORATE STRUCTURES DJCA 400

BUS 475 MERGERS, ACQUISITIONS AND INTEGRATION DJCG 400

CMS 400 BUSINESS COMMUNICATION APPLICATIONS DQR 400 & DSL 400

COM 304 INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM DJCG 300

COM 305 POPULAR CULTURE DSSG300

COM 308 SOCIAL MEDIA ANALYTICS DSL 300 & DQR 300

COM 310 APPLIED MEDIA DSSA 300

COM 335 FILM AND TELEVISION HISTORY (1950 - PRESENT) DSSG 300

COM 336 HISTORY RADIO, TV & INTERNET MEDIA DSSG 300

COM 341 PERSUASION & PROPAGANDA DJCA 300

COM 350 COMMUNICATION LAW AND ETHICS DJCA 300

COM 360 COMMUNICATION THEORIES DBRA 300

COM 375 ADVERTISING, PR & SOCIETY DSSA 300

COM 410 FILM THEORY DSSG 400

COM 414 DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION DSSA 400

COM 421 COMMUNICATION & SOCIAL CHANGE DJCA 400

COM 430 INTERNATIONAL FILM DBRG 400

COM 436 GENDER COMMUNICATION DBRG 400

COM 451 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION DSSG 400

COM 475 SENIOR COMMUNICATION CAPSTONE DJCG 400

COM 476 ADVERTISING, SOCIAL MEDIA AND PUBLIC RELATIONS CAPSTONE DJCG 400

COM 477 COMMUNICATION CAPSTONE DJCG 400

COM 482 DIGITAL ART AND DESIGN CAPSTONE DJCG 400

COM 483 MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM CAPSTONE DJCG 400

COM 484 FILM AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION CAPSTONE DJCG 400

COM 492 STRATEGIES IN ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS RESEARCH DQR 400 & DSL 400

CRJ 310 FORENSIC SCIENCE DSL 300

CRJ 330 LAW AND THE COURTS DJCA 300

CRJ 400 GENDER, CRIME AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE DSSG 400

CRJ 420 ETHICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE DJCA 400

CRJ 450 RESEARCH IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE DQR 400

CRJ 496 VICTIMOLOGY DSSG 400

DBRA 300 LOGICAL REASONING DQR 300

DBRG 300 MAGIC, SCIENCE AND RELIGION DSL 300

DBRG 300 UNINTELLIGENT DESIGN DSL 300

DBRG 400 DEVIANCE ON OUR DOORSTEP DQR 400

DQR 300 ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY DSL 300

DRA 313 THEATRICAL DESIGN AND PRODUCTION DQR 300

DRA 323 HISTORY OF THEATRE DSS 300

DRA 373 VOICE AND MOVEMENT DSL 300

DRA 478 DRAMA SENIOR CAPSTONE DJC 400

ENG 311 CREATIVE WRITING DBRG 300

ENG 325 SHAKESPEARE DBRG 300

ENG 340 BRITISH LITERATURE I DSSG 300

ENG 350 MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE DSSG300

ENG 405 SEMINAR IN GENDER & LITERATURE DSSG 400

ENV 340 ENVIRONMENTAL STATISTICS DQR & DSL 300

ENV 368 PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY DSL 300

ENV 450 CAPSTONE IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES DJCG 400 & DSL 400

ESL 330 CROSS CULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS DSSA 300

FOR 330 FINANCIAL INVESTIGATIONS DQR 300

FOR 340 TRACE EVIDENCE AND MICROSCOPY DSL 300

FOR 395 ARSON AND EXPLOSION INVESTIGATION DQR 300

FOR 440 FORENSIC PATHOLOGY DSL 400

FOR 450 FORENSIC CASE STUDIES DSSA 400

FOR 495 CAPSTONE IN FORENSIC SCIENCE DJCA 400

GVC 375 HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY DSSG 300

GVC 442 ADVANCED DIGITAL ART DSSG 400

HA 481 SENIOR SEMINAR DJCG 400

HIS 332 HISTORY OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM DJCA 300

HIS 360 THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE THROUGH FILM DSSA 300

HIS 481 SEMINAR IN HISTORY:MOCK CONGRESS DJCA 400

HS 301 SOCIAL PROBLEMS & POLICY DJCA 300

HS 482 HUMAN SERVICES SENIOR SEMINAR DJCA 400

HUM 335 WORLD RELIGIONS DBRG300

HUM 340 PHILOSOPHY AND POPULAR CULTURE DBRG 300

HUM 350 AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY DBRA 300

HUM 420 ETHICAL DECISION MAKING DBRG400

IRPS 310 INTERNATIONAL LAW DJCG 300

IRPS 330 POLITICS OF DEVELOPMENT DSSG 300

IRPS 360 POLITICS OF INDIGINOUS PEOPLES DBRG 300

IRPS 475 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS DBRG 400

IRPS 483 SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS DJCG 400

MAT 320 METHODS OF CALCULUS DQR 300

MKT 410 CONSUMER & ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR DSSG 400

MKT 420 THE EVOLUTION OF FASHION AND RETAIL DSSG 400

POL 302 COMPARATIVE AND REGIONAL POLITICS DSSG 300

POL 402 CRITICAL ISSUES IN POLITICS DSSA 400

POL 385 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY & JUSTICE DJCG 300 & DSL 300

POL 495 CAPSTONE IN SOCIAL JUSTICE DJCG 400

PSY 315 PSYCHOLOGY TEST & MEASUREMENT DQR 300 & DSL 300

PSY 355 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY DSL 300

PSY 360 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY DSSG 300

PSY 361 CURRENT PERSPECTIVES IN SUBSTANCE ABUSE DSL 300 & DSSA 300

PSY 370 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY DSSA 300

PSY 420 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY DSL 400

PSY 440 RESEARCH & STATISTICS IN PSYCHOLOGY DQR 400

PSY 460 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY DQR 400

PSY 480 CROSS CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY DSSA 400

PSY 490 SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY DJCG 400

PSY 495 CAPSTONE IN PSYCHOLOGY DJCG 400

SCI 350 PHYSICS I & LAB DQR 400

SCI 360 ECOLOGY & LAB DJCG 300

SCI 390 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I & LAB DSL 300

SCI 391 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II & LAB DSL 300

SCI 460 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY & LAB DJCG 400

SCI 490 BIOLOGY SENIOR SEMINAR DJCG 400

SCI 491 EVOLUTION DSSG 400

SOC 335 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS DJCG 300

SOC 450 RACE AND ETHNICITY DSSG 400

Undeclared Major Tracks