Lynn psychology professor helps train Florida Marlins

“I teach players how to reduce stress and anxiety, increase focus, minimize obstacles and optimize overall performance,” said Seifer

Published Aug. 16, 2011

Robert Seifer, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.Like many Marlins fans, Robert Seifer, associate professor of psychology in Lynn’s College of Liberal Education, spends much of his free time at Sun Life Stadium.

Rather than in the stands, you can find Seifer in the locker room behind the scenes – as the official team psychologist performance enhancement coach for the Florida Marlins, a Major League Baseball (MLB) baseball team.

“I developed and implemented a psychological performance enhancement program for the players in the Marlins organization,” said Seifer. “This program was designed to increase mental focus, concentration, and to create routines and goals which will allow each individual player to utilize his full psychological potential. I teach players how to reduce stress and anxiety, increase focus, minimize obstacles and optimize overall performance.”

In addition, Seifer provides educational and counseling services related to drugs of abuse and enhancement to help keep the Florida Marlins in compliance with the rules and regulations as established by the Commissioner of Major League Baseball.

Seifer began his position with the Marlins on Jan. 1, 2011, but has been working with various MLB teams as an expert certified clinician for the diagnosis and treatment of Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) since 2008. He is one of approximately 25 expert certified clinicians in the United States.

In the classroom and on the field

Although Seifer has a passion for baseball, his first love is teaching and working with students.

“I am able to use my real life experiences from my applied work in the field to engage students with case studies and demonstrate successful clinical application,” said Seifer. “My work with professional athletes also provides me with credibility, and my stories engage the students, peek their interest and start robust dialogues related to the application of psychological theory in the real world.”

In addition to teaching, Seifer uses psychological enhancement techniques to improve the performance of players on Lynn’s baseball team. Seifer has been working with Coach Rudy Garbalosa since the spring of 2009 – the same year Lynn baseball won the NCAA Division II championship (the first national victory for Lynn baseball, but the 19th title in school history).

“I have provided Lynn’s baseball team with multiple group workshops and have met with each baseball player individually to set individual goals, routines and to minimize distractions,” said Seifer. “Part of my wellness training includes locker room conversations and on-field interventions.”

Seifer has also worked with Lynn’s woman’s golf team to enhance their athletic performance.

“Psychological enhancement can benefit all people and all types of athletes, said Seifer. “I tailor my approach to the specific needs of the person I am working with, regardless of the sport.”

More on Seifer

Seifer is an associate professor of psychology at Lynn University and a licensed clinical psychologist with a private practice in Boca Raton, Fla. He maintains a general practice working with high functioning well children, adolescents and adults. He also has expertise in the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) across the lifespan.

In 2002, Seifer completed his doctoral dissertation, “Differences Between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Learning Disabled (LD) Children on Memory, Vigilance, and Behavior Measures.” In addition, Seifer is the team psychologist/performance enhancement coach for the Florida Marlins.

In this role, Seifer can speak to the media regarding the benefits of psychological enhancement with athletes, the over-diagnosis of ADHD (“pop-culture term”), addictive behaviors, alcohol prevention, ADHD vs. LD, and depression, anxiety and self-esteem levels in college students.