Business Professor Analyzes Knowledge as a Suppressant of Progress

“Major businesses like GM could benefit from reevaluating their organizational process,” said Cipolla

Published Jul. 28, 2009

Does what you know impede progress? That’s the question Lynn business professor, John Cipolla, asks in his recent article, “The Organization as Artifact: Structuring the Organization in Times of Constant, Dramatic Change.”

John Cipolla, A.B., Ph.D.In a previous paper, “The Role of Knowledge and Culture in Organizational Crises – Managing and Planning in ‘Interesting’ Times,” Cipolla addressed the need for a pragmatic definition of crisis in a changing world. “This paper,” said Cipolla, “led to the extension of the concept to embrace innovation – sort of the flip side of the coin. ‘The Organization as Artifact’ explores this, using concepts current in the discipline of design.”

Cipolla’s “The Organization as Artifact” article explains how a person’s experience, knowledge and pre-determined social organization affects not just the efficiency, but the efficacy of generating and delivering recognized value in business. “The intent of this paper is to guide and direct efforts on organizational innovation,” said Cipolla. “The intent of my paper on organizational crises was to provide a useful set of tools.”

According to Cipolla, major businesses including General Motors, health organizations, financial companies, and the Federal and state governments could benefit from reevaluating their organization processes to improve efficacy.

Watch this YouTube video to learn more about Cipolla’s article, “The Organization as Artifact: Structuring the Organization in Times of Constant, Dramatic Change.”

Source: Cipolla teaches a variety of courses in Lynn’s College of Business and Management on the topics of operational management, business strategy and crisis management. He completed his Ph.D. dissertation on organizational change, has almost 25 years of first-hand experience consulting major organizations.